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Farm Home in India by The Vrindavan Mission


The Vrindavan Project Farm House India Photo Monika Sathe Yellowtrace 01

The Vrindavan Project Farm House India Photo Monika Sathe Yellowtrace 03

The Vrindavan Project Farm House India Photo Monika Sathe Yellowtrace 04

 

Situated within the rural city of Thane, simply outdoors of bustling Mumbai, Farm Home by The Vrindavan Mission just isn’t your bizarre up to date Indian dwelling. It’s a place with sturdy ambitions in direction of sustainability. It’s a dwelling that locations its loyalty in supplies and works to harness them to supply structurally sturdy, and daring design decisions. Doesn’t seem like it although, proper?

Via cautious consideration of its materiality, The Vrindavan Mission have designed the envelope of the Farm Home to eradicate the necessity for typical structural parts, corresponding to metal beams or columns. A extremely sustainable strategy, this gesture not solely reduces prices related to structural members but in addition honours the embodied power in every of the development supplies they determine to make use of.

From afar, the home seems to be considerably floating on its panorama. The phantasm is created by a low floating plinth beam that’s wrapped across the dwelling’s perimeter. Tucked underneath it, a moat runs across the total constructing. You’re in all probability pondering, is that this a fortress? Have they got castles in Thane? Not fairly. Farm Home’s moat not solely serves as a nice water characteristic, however extra so exists to cope with the agricultural website’s many environmental challenges; the physique of water protects the house from numerous infestations, and likewise permits passive cooling, to assist the house by Maharastra’s hotter months. The moat is crammed with overflow water from the pool, and goes on to feed the farm’s plantations.

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Sitting atop a hill in rural Himatnagar, Ahmedabad, is an all-encompassing dance of scale and proportion…

 

The Vrindavan Project Farm House India Photo Monika Sathe Yellowtrace 05

The Vrindavan Project Farm House India Photo Monika Sathe Yellowtrace 07

The Vrindavan Project Farm House India Photo Monika Sathe Yellowtrace 10

The Vrindavan Project Farm House India Photo Monika Sathe Yellowtrace 13

 

Embedded with orange veining, Farm Home’s earthy brown rammed earth partitions embody the constructing in pure soil discovered from close by websites. Sure, they’re texturally engaging and show to be fairly a characteristic, nevertheless, aesthetics was not the one purpose this materials was used. Rammed by hand, The Vrindavan Mission opted to make use of a shuttering meeting. What does this imply? One single equipment allowed the crew to construct partitions of any measurement, utilizing solely human vitality, and fundamental uncooked supplies. Which means that a full 8-foot by 8-foot wall might go up in as little as in the future, all whereas producing a naturally low carbon footprint. The bonus? The rammed earth partitions are additionally structural, holding up all the roof of the house. No columns or piers required!

Very like many up to date Indian properties, Farm Home largely embraces concrete ceilings. Nevertheless, in an effort to strategy this extra sustainably, the architects launched one thing fairly distinctive—small earthen pots. These can be found virtually in all places in India. They’re virtually all the time regionally made and are available a number of fundamental normal sizes.

Whereas they might appear ornamental, these small earthen pots do much more than simply make for an fascinating architectural characteristic. “Inverted terracotta pots forged hole fillers into the essential slab thickness, minimizing the concrete content material required and drastically lowering the useless load of the construction,” shares The Vrindavan Mission’s Ranjeet Mukherjee. So actually, what they’re doing right here is taking one thing as humble as the essential Indian earthen pot, and utilizing it as each an architectural and sustainable building resolution.

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The Vrindavan Project Farm House India Photo Monika Sathe Yellowtrace 14

The Vrindavan Project Farm House India Photo Monika Sathe Yellowtrace 17

The Vrindavan Project Farm House India Photo Monika Sathe Yellowtrace 18

 

Within the bedrooms, the ceilings take a special strategy; there aren’t any metal beams, no columns and no concrete (and, no earthen pots). There are, nevertheless, sculptural vaulted brick ceilings. It’s in these rooms that The Vrindavan Mission celebrates the structural strengths of brickwork—and actually glorify it. Giant shutter-like home windows line the partitions, working with the bowing brick ceiling to attract in each pure mild and naturally ventilate the house.

Salvaging timber doorways, home windows and even timber columns from demolished mansions in Karaikkudi in Tamil Nadu, Farm Home ensures that even the timber utilized in its dwelling contributes in direction of its sustainability ambitions. This additionally comes with the large win of scoring premium timber that the house could not have in any other case had.

Maybe probably the most fascinating characteristic, nevertheless, is the geometric gazebo, designed as 5 interlocking pyramid constructions. “We tried to innovate the area’s conventional roof type through the use of regionally acquired timber with normal Mangalore tiles,” explains Ranjeet Mukherjee, who managed to create one thing up to date and distinctive. Open on all 4 sides, the gazebo stitches collectively the backyard, the pool, the recreation space and the house.

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[Images courtesy of The Vrindavan Project. Photography by Monika Sathe.]

 



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